Day 8: Qikiqtarjuaq

 
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Qikiqtarjuaq: A welcoming community

After travelling through Coronation Fiord, the expedition team set off for Qikiqtarjuaq, a small Inuit community in Nunavut.  Once the ship had anchored in the harbour, the team was warmly greeted at the pier.  The community welcomed the team with performances, a traditional seal skinning demonstration, art and crafts by local Inuit artists, and a feast of 'country food' including fish, seal and whale meat called muktuk.

Choose a hotspot for an in-depth look at one of the fascinating things we learned in this location.

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Qikiqtarjuaq: In town

Qikiqtarjuaq is a subsistence-based community located just off of Baffin Island that relies on hunting and fishing. The members of the expedition team were treated to some local food such as Arctic Char, clams, narwhal, bannock and hot tea.

Choose a hotspot for an in-depth look at one of the fascinating things we learned in this location.

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Qikiqtarjuaq: Mountain top

Qikiqtarjuaq and its surrounding landscape was filled with an abundance of natural history.  Here, students broke off into teams and followed a designated scientist into the mountains that overlooked the community, to go exploring.

Choose a hotspot for an in-depth look at one of the fascinating things we learned in this location.

Day 8: Qikiqtarjuaq

 
The village of Qikiqtarjuaq.
 
 
 
 
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Arctic as a homeland

Qikiqtarjuaq is a small Inuit community of just over 500 people located on a small island off the east coast of Baffin Island, one of 26 communities spread across Nunavut. The area is stunningly beautiful and rich in marine mammals. The traditions of hunting, fishing and living from the land remain strong here.

A small village.
 

Marine life

Fish make up a large portion of many communities diets. Arctic char is a favorite along with other marine life such as seals and walruses.

Canoes sitting in water.
 

Human presence

Inuksuit mark the Arctic and are a symbol of human presence. They are used as reference points for navigational purposes such as travel routes, fishing places, camps and hunting grounds. The height of this inuksuk shows how often it is used.

An inuksuk on a mountain.
 

Killer whales

In the distance is the perfect habitat for bowhead whales. As the climate changes, many locals in the community have seen killer whales appear this far north. Killer whales are a new and deadly predator for bowhead whales.

Killer whales jumping out of water.